Storm Check List

    storm check sheet

     

    Storm Check list:

    Prep:

    • Bring in any yard decor, secure anything that will fly around, secure gates, bring in hoses, potted plants, etc. Bring in patio furniture and grills.
    • Pick up your yard and anything that might blow in the wind. Bring in pool furniture if you can. Don’t put it in the water because it can damage the pool.
    • Place everything you own that is important and necessary in a backpack or small file box that is easy to grab. Include your wallet with ID, phone, hand sanitizer, snacks, etc. Get plastic sleeves for important documents.
    • Make sure you have cash on hand. Power goes out, so do ATM’s
    • Gather all candles, flashlights, lighters, matches, batteries, and other items and keep them accessible.
    • Drop your A/C in advance and lower temperatures in your fridges.
    • Put a small suitcase in your car in case you decide to evacuate. Also put at least one jug of water in your car. It will still be there if you don’t evacuate! You don’t need to store all water in the house. Remember to pack for pets as well.
    • Check on all family members, set up emergency back up plans, and check on elderly neighbors.
    • Remember, pets are family too. Take them with you!
    • Put documents in gallons-size (or larger) Ziploc bags. Put larger items in double large trash bags cocooned so the opening of the first bag is in the bottom of the second bag. Put some clothes in plastic bags in case you get a roof leak. Duct tape bags closed. Put valuables on a high shelf in a closet.
    • Think now about where you are going to park your car. A parking garage is ideal. Outside in a low-lying area or under a tree is the worst. Think about all of the cars you’ve seen ruined in storms because people made bad choices about where they parked the car before the storm. When we know the storm track, we’ll have a better idea which side of a building will give the best protection. Next to a building on the downwind side gives you the best chance if you have to leave your car outside.
    • Fill Ziploc bags ¾ full of water and stuff them in your freezer to fill up the space. The less air you have in the freezer, the longer your refrigerator will stay cold. Do NOT turn your refrigerator to any lower setting than normal – that can damage the unit.
    • Choose a friend or relative out of town to be the contact point for your family or group of friends. After a storm, it is always easier to get a call out of the area than within the storm zone. Be sure everybody has the out-of-town number and make a plan to check in ASAP after the storm.
    • If you live in a high rise, be sure you know what the procedures are going to be in the building. Will the building be evacuated? Will the water continue to work? Will elevators work? What is on a generator? If you can stay in the building (if it’s away from the water) find an interior hallway on a low floor where you can set up camp during the storm. It will not be safe to be on a high floor or near windows, even with modern hurricane impact windows. A hallway surrounded by concrete is your best bet.
    • Think about what you will sit on if you are in a hallway or other safe spot for a number of hours – maybe 12 hours or more. Consider comfortable folding chairs. Take food to your safe spot. Have books or other non-electronic amusements, including for the kids.
    • Most importantly, be sure you know a safe place where you and your family can ride out the storm, if it comes. This is the most critical decision you can make today. If you live near the water, put together the food, clothes, valuable items, and important papers you’ll take with you NOW. Leave as early as possible.

     

    Shopping List:

    • Stock up on pet food and fill up bowls of water for pets.
    • Refill any medications. Most insurance companies allow for 2 emergency refills per year.
    • Fill your propane tanks. You can heat soup cans, boil water, make coffee, and other stuff besides just grilling meat. Get an extra, if possible.
    • Gas up your car and have a spare gas container for your generator or your car when you run out.
    • Try to get LED flashlights and lanterns. They last much longer. Have at least one flashlight for every person in your family, and ideally have a lantern or two for general lighting.
    • Get a portable radio and plenty of batteries so your whole family can listen to news coverage if the power goes out. Do NOT depend on your cellphone for communications.
    • Plastic bags and duct tape are your friends. You can’t buy too many of them. Duck tape.
    • I recommend 7 days of water and food, and an AM/FM portable radio so you can keep up with news coverage.

     

    Clean:

    • Wash all trash cans, big and small, and fill with water for flushing toilets. Line outdoor trash cans with trash bags, fill with water and store in the garage. Add bleach to sterilize.
    • Wash all dirty clothes and bed sheets. Anything dirty will smell without the A/C, you may need the items, and with no A/C, you’ll be sweating a lot. You’re going to want clean sheets.
    • Clean your environment so you have clear, easy escape routes. Even if that means temporarily moving furniture to one area.
    • Scrub all bathrooms so you are starting with a clean odor free environment. Store water filled trash cans next to each toilet for flushing.
    • Clean all counters in advance. Start with a clean surface. Buy Clorox Wipes for cleaning when there is no power. Mop your floors and vacuum. If power is out for 10 days, you’ll have to live in the mess you started with.
    • Shower just before the storm is scheduled to hit
    • Keep baby wipes next to each toilet. Don’t flush them. It’s not the time to risk clogging your toilet!
    • Run your dishwasher, don’t risk having dirty smelly dishes and you need every container for water! Remember you’ll need clean water for brushing your teeth, washing yourself, and cleaning your hands.
    • Do your laundry and wash your dishes before the storm.

     

    Water:

    • Fill every tub and sink with water. Cover sinks with Saran Wrap to keep it from collecting dust. Fill washing machine and leave lid up to store water.
    • Fill old empty water bottles and other containers with water and keep near sinks for washing hands.
    • Fill every Tupperware with water and store in freezer. These will help keep food cold longer and serve as a back up water supply.
    • Fill drinking cups with water and cover with Saran Wrap. Store as many as possible in fridge. The rest you can store on the counter and use first before any water bottles are opened. Ice is impossible to find after the storm.
    • Reserve fridge space for storing tap water and keep the sealed water bottles on the counter.
    • Be well hydrated before the storm hits and avoid salty foods that make you dehydrated.

     

    Food:

    • Cook any meats in advance and other perishable foods. You can freeze cooked food. Hard boil eggs for snacks for first day without power.
    • Toss out any expiring food, clean cat litter boxes, empty all trash cans in the house, including bathrooms. Remove anything that will cause an odor when the A/C is off. If you don’t have a trash day pickup before the storm, find a dumpster.
    • Put a cup of water in each freezer, place a coin on top after it is frozen…keep this in your freezer to help you gauge the temperature if the power goes out. If the coin stays on top, the food is staying frozen. If the coin falls into the water, the freezer thawed out and most food will likely need to be thrown away. This is super helpful is you have to leave and come back, as it may appear everything is still frozen, but if the coin is in the cup–you will know!!

     

     

    Electronics:

    • Charge any device that provides light. Laptops, tablets, cameras, video cameras, and old phones. Old cell phones can still be used for dialing 911. Charge external battery back ups
    • Before the storm, unplug all electronics. There will be power surges during and after the storm.
    • Take photos today or tomorrow of every room, every piece of electronics, and everything valuable…..walk room to room–open cabinets/drawers and closets. This will help if you need to make a claim later. It will show proof of items and help you list all the items (help your memory, so you don’t forget anything) Upload the pictures to the cloud – Dropbox, Microsoft Cloud, iCloud, Google Drive, etc. – before the storm.
    • Also take photos of key documents and upload them as well. You can do that today.
    • Save your contacts in your phone to the cloud. If you don’t know how to do that, frame grab your screen or have someone take photos of your contacts with their phone and email or text the pictures back to you to a friend. Don’t take a chance on losing your contacts if something happens to your phone.
    • To repeat!! Do NOT count on your cellphone for communications. When Harvey hit Texas as a Cat 4, it knocked out the mobile phone system. In addition, your battery may run down and you may have no ability to charge it. Have an adapter so you can charge your cellphone in a car, have extra charges, and back-up batteries if you can.
    • Your dishwasher, washing machine & fridge/freezer are excellent “safes” in your house if you need someplace to put valuables. These could be good places to put your bagged-up photos, for example. They are designed to keep water in, so they also keep water out. J   But of course, take all the important/irreplaceable items you can if you leave.
    • Secure your photographs and albums in double plastic bags.

     

    The storm has passed. What now?

    • When power returns to your home, do not start all major appliances at once. Turn them on gradually to reduce damage to sensitive equipment.
    • Avoid downed, damaged or loose power lines and report them immediately to the local police and fire department, as well as to the local transmission and distribution services utility in your area.
    • Even if you have ventilation, never use a generator indoors. This includes garages, basements and crawlspaces. Exhaust fumes contain high levels of carbon monoxide, which can be deadly if inhaled. Even when left outside, keep generators away from doors and windows and at least 10 feet away from your home. Also, allow your generator to cool off before refilling it with gas – splashing gas on hot generator components can lead to a fire.
    • Do not use electrical or gas appliances that have been wet, and do not turn on damaged appliances because of the hazards of electric shock or fire.
    • Never use charcoal indoors because burning charcoal produces high levels of carbon monoxide that can reach lethal levels in enclosed spaces.
    • Follow post-storm food and water safety precautions to protect your family from contamination.
    • Stay away from flood waters as they can contain harmful contaminates and hide dangerous debris.
    • Take photographs of any damage incurred.

    If flooding or water damaged occurred, begin cleaning up and repairs as soon as possible to avoid mold and be sure

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